Interview with Actress Sylvia Brown from The Acquired Taste

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, books, chuck jett, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, frightening, Gay Horror Authors, holidays, Horror, horror art, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, movie discussion, movie review, movies, new horror movies, Pro Se Press, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, scary movies, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Traumatized by Alexander S. Brown, Uncategorized on September 15, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

The Acquired Taste is a short film written for screen and directed by Chuck Jett, creator of Empty Coffin Studio Films.  It was tastefully adapted by the short story of the same title by author and producer Alexander S. Brown.  Fans can anticipate a free viewing of the film in 2017.  It is currently being shown at conventions throughout the Southern states.  Its next appearance will be at Contraflow Convention in New Orleans, LA.

14341638_10209018528533190_965537390_n 

For the final interview from this dark comedy, I would like to welcome actress Sylvia Brown, so that she may elaborate on her part in The Acquired Taste and her life.

 

  1. What made you want to be a part of The Acquired Taste?

I wanted to help my son and see what it was like to act in a film.

  1. What was your experience like on set?

Everyone was nice and polite and had patience with me.

  1. What other projects have you been a part of?

A couple of school plays.

  1. Are there any roles that you would turn down? Or are there any roles that would make you uncomfortable?

Any that regard nudity, animal abuse, and child abuse.

  1. What role is more fun? The victim, the hero, or the villain. Why?

The villain.  I’d rather do it to someone else; rather than have it done to me.

  1. What got you into acting?

My son.  When he wrote the short story The Acquired Taste, he had me in mind as the mother.

  1. What are some of your favorite movies?

Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Wizard of Oz, Footloose, Dirty Dancing, Ghost, Stripes, Haunted Honeymoon, Ghost Dad, Back to the Future, E.T., Carousel, Free Willie, Snow Day, Are We there Yet, Romeo and Juliet, What Dreams May Come, Encino Man, The Goonies, The Poseidon Adventure, and many more.

  1. Who are your favorite actors/actresses? How do you draw inspiration from them?

Judy Garland, Michael J. Fox, and The Rock

  1. Who are your favorite directors?

Stephen Spielberg

  1. What future projects are you working on?

None, at the moment.

  1. Tell us about yourself.

I’m a homebody person for the most part.  My interests are family, animals, animal rights and activism, paranormal research, astrology, and music.

Connect with Sylvia Brown:

Facebook

Instagram

Purchase a copy of Traumatized HERE!

Watch Chuck Jett’s first short film, PINKY SWEAR HERE!

 

Ever Wondered How Those Stories Get Started?

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, books, cult books, cult classic, Cult horror, Dark Oak Press, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, Gay Horror Authors, Halloween, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized, werewolf, werewolves on September 14, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

Happy Werewolf Wednesday!  Instead of Instagraming/Facebooking/Twittering werewolf jokes today, as usual, I decided to address some reoccurring questions that readers had about my novel Syrenthia Falls.  For those who haven’t read my novel, don’t worry, my answers shouldn’t give away any major spoilers, and if you like what you see, Amazon links will be provided at the conclusion of my blog.  If you have never read Syrenthia Falls, this is what you can expect:

9200000030688371

Syrenthia is a teenage misfit who has never tasted friendship or romance. She has always been typecast as a wallflower, black sheep, and bookworm. Near the beginning of her senior year, she is befriended by Sarah who introduces her to a group of classmates that accept her as is.

Syrenthia quickly learns that this group of free spirited teenagers shares her strongest interest, urban legends. Each day, she learns more and more about a place called “The Falls” where someone or something has terrorized the land for years and only those with a death wish dare to venture out.

Upon arrival, the friends see that “The Falls” is nothing more than a swimming hole, a sandbar, and a waterfall. All is fun and games, until night falls. Once the full moon shines overhead, they are faced with a monstrous beast that is savage and extremely hungry. Only two people survive, one escapes unharmed, the other, Syrenthia, is not so lucky. However, over the passing weeks, Syrenthia grows to be a powerful and dangerous force. One by one her enemies are subjected to her wrath.

Now, the questions:

 “What makes your werewolf novel stand out among the rest?” 

I hear this question frequently.  Even when I pitched Syrenthia Falls to Dark Oak Press, I had to quickly explain why this book should be published, and how it differed from other novels.  I started my pitch with a mistake.  Nervous, I took a deep breath and blurted, “This book is the first in a series and the main character is the town itself.”

My publisher replied, “Yeah, that hasn’t been done before.”

Still, I had the floor. I agreed with him, and admitted that having a town as the main character was a common theme among the genre.  Since the ice was now broken, I felt like I had nothing left to lose.  I continued, “Syrenthia Falls is a werewolf novel set in suburbia.  In a sense, it’s like Stephen King’s Carrie meets An American Werewolf in London.  The werewolf is a metaphor.  It regards the beast that dwells within each of us and how that beast can become provoked.  That’s why with my novel, I have manipulated the werewolf subgenre so that it is presented as a retelling of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.”

With my publisher’s interest piqued, I now felt more confident.  I continued, “To avoid the werewolf cliché, I researched Voodoo, Satanism, and European superstitions.  In my research, I have found unique folklore and philosophies that I have used to construct my modern day beast.”

Although he wasn’t entirely sold, he did say, “Send it over and I’ll look at it.”

Months later, after emailing Dark Oak Press my manuscript, I received my acceptance letter.

“What fun facts can you tell me about your book?”

Some people who have read Syrenthia Falls, might wonder why I have described some characters who don’t show back up in this volume.  Trust, there is a reason for this, they have their own story.  In time, they will have their own book.  Again, the town is the main character and this town (Havensburg) has many residents and many dark secrets.  In the following Havensburg books, I plan to introduce new characters, lifestyles, scenarios, and classic creatures while breathing new life into them.

As I earlier noted, my werewolf was inspired by Voodoo, Satanism, and European superstitions and philosophies.  Prior to writing Syrenthia Falls, I had read a book called Voodoo Secrets by Heike Owusu.  This book had a segment in it, where it spoke of how werewolves detested bitter blood, and the two elements that made the blood bitter were coffee or tea.  It noted that by purging oneself with coffee or tea, one’s blood would gain a bitter smell that would act as a repellent against the werewolf.  When utilizing this information, I decided to go a step further and make the tea a weapon, such as silver.

I researched Levayan Satanism when I decided to dive into Syrenthia’s thoughts.  When I was surfing the web one day, I stumbled upon an interview that Bob Larson provided to Zeena Levay and Nikolas Schreck.  In this interview, I learned what their fundaments were and I found it interesting on how human based they had made their commandments. These are the fundamentals that I loosely elaborated upon in her thought process.

For the final touch, I returned to the root of werewolf folklore – Europe.  In my research, I learned of a formula that occult practitioners would concoct when wanting to transform into a werewolf.  So that I could birth my physical monster, I read of how these practitioners utilized herbs, wolf skins, salves, and chanting to create something bloodthirsty.  What I found most interesting is that opium had been used in their transformation spell.

“I thought the book was young adult, but it ended up being adult.”

This was a complaint that I received in a review.  Things like this happen.  However, just because a novel features teenagers, doesn’t mean it is young adult related.  But, truth be it, this was a concern I had when writing the novel.  When creating the characters, I couldn’t see them being anyone other than a group of teenagers, as I wanted to focus on peer pressure, child abuse, bullying, and coming of age.  Yet, although I focused on these subjects, the book is intended for adults only.

Who are your favorite characters?”

Each of my lead characters are based off of people I know, so I favor all of them.

Sarah is one of my favorites, as she grows from being an abused child, to being a fighter.  Writing Sarah was a touchy subject.  I based her off of a high school friend who suffered sexual abuse while we were in school.  During our school years, I watched her go from being a victim, to becoming a heroine.

My favorite character, of course, is Syrenthia.  The reason being is because I could identify with her as a person who was once a shy outcast.  The emotions and feelings she experiences make her a grey character and someone that people can either sympathize or empathize with.  The fact that she is the embodiment of good and evil, makes her more interesting.

“Why did you name your book Syrenthia Falls when the character is named Syrenthia and there is a location called Owen Falls?  The two don’t go together.”

I have been asked this on occasion and actually, the two go very well together.  The title regards Syrenthia descending a downward spiral.  As the reader progresses in the book, they see how she slowly unravels more and more until there is very little of the real Syrenthia left.  The waterfall also plays a great factor in this novel, as this is where Syrenthia begins her downward spiral, and in many cultures, water is seen as a symbol of transformation and rebirth.

“Why should I buy your book?”

Syrenthia Falls is a novel that I feel won’t disappoint you and I feel it is something that will renew the age old legend of the werewolf.  It is a piece of literature that has currently inspired artwork by Courtney Vice and tea by Kimberly Richardson.  Links are listed below so you may purchase my book and the inspired art and tea.

13512227_10208441819035813_8149557217276236269_n

Click each name to be redirected to the page of your liking.

Courtney Vice’s Facebook Page

Viridian Tea Company

Dark Oak Press (Free chapter of Syrenthia Falls Here).

Syrenthia Falls purchase link.  Available in paperback, hardback, and ebook.

Alexander S. Brown Facebook

Alexander S. Brown Instagram

Alexander S. Brown Twitter

Book Review for Under the Devil’s Wing: The Beast of Birmingham by T. S. Barnett

Posted in Alabama Authors, Amazon, author reviews, authors, Book Reviews, books, cult books, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, Fiction, Halloween, holidays, Horror, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, south, southern authors, T. S. Barnett, Uncategorized, werewolf, werewolves on September 8, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

21865789

 

This is my first time reading T.S. Barnett and the experience left me looking forward to the rest of her books.  With “Under the Devil’s Wing: The Beast of Birmingham” each chapter is dedicated to its own character.  As the book progresses, the point of views change, exploring the mind of each antagonist and protagonist.  To me, this method of storytelling was most intriguing as it introduces everyone individually, then skillfully brings them together for a tense conclusion.

“The Beast of Birmingham” starts with an opening that is both sexual and violent.  A bartender by the name of Lilah is seduced by Sam, then murdered once he changes into a werewolf.  Shortly after, we discover that Sam, AKA Scratch, has become infamous in online forums and hearsay regarding his brutality.  With exhausting his options of refuge, Sam visits David, his son by wolf bloodline.

David is the kind of werewolf who has learned how to control his urges, and by doing so, lives in harmony.  Even though he doesn’t want to welcome Sam into his home, as he knows Sam is a troublemaker, David feels obligated to provide this father figure with shelter.  During Sam’s visit, he entices David to transform with him and have a night out.  Against David’s better judgement, he gives into Sam’s instigation.

What begins as a fun, late night run, soon turns deadly.  As the two become separated, Sam gives into his animal instinct and attacks a woman named Marcy.  During the attack, David hears the dispute and runs to the rescue before Sam kills her.  David, being the peacemaker, takes Marcy to a private doctor who helps nurse her.

As the plot thickens, we learn about Alicia, who has survived a prior attack from Sam.  Alicia is an ex-marine, who is scorned and looking for vengeance.  After attending group therapy for her assault, she is abducted by a man named Reiniger, who takes her to a warehouse style prison.  Here, he assures Marcy that he means her no harm.  Furthermore, he explains that he can help her exact revenge upon Sam, if she joins their group of werewolf hunters known as Wolfjäger.  Of course, she accepts his proposal.

With the stage set, we redirect our focus to Marcy, who wakes up safe and healed in the private doctor’s office.  Upon her awakening, David explains the circumstance and offers her guidance.  Due to his caring heart, and feeling like she has nowhere else to turn now that she’s a werewolf, she feels that he is her best option.  After she joins them, David explains they should take refuge in a more secluded area with an experienced acquaintance named Nat.   By doing this, Marcy will be able to undergo her first transformation and adapt to her new lifestyle in peace while receiving female guidance.

Upon meeting Nat, we learn that Sam changed her into a werewolf decades ago, and she is a mother figure to David.  Such as David, she isn’t fond of Sam, yet she feels obligated to help the trio because of the bond she shares with David and the empathy she feels for Marcy.  After everyone settles in together, the subject of werewolf hunters come into play and how they, as werewolves, must tread carefully.  Although Sam dismisses their worries, as he claims werewolf hunters are only urban myth, he soon learns that werewolf hunters do indeed exist.  At this point forward, “Under the Devil’s Wing” becomes a game of cat and mouse.

By the book’s conclusion, very little is resolved between the werewolves and the werewolf hunters.  If anything, the ending opens up a whole new keg of nails, which is sure to keep the series strong for many volumes to come.

Overall, the style in which this book is written is peculiar.  Although it is packed with information and backstory, it is crafted in such a way that it is a fast read with little to no boring information.  Also, I applaud Barnett for being able to create such a diverse cast of characters while keeping them gray.  The way she brought me into their thought process and life, made me fear for each of them when they were in danger, this even included Sam.   I think that since none of the characters are completely good, or completely bad, it makes them feel more human, adding a deeper level of realism.

From a scale of 1 to 10.  1 being the worst and 10 being the best, I would rate this book an 8 ½.   It had likable characters, kept me in suspense, and kept me wanting more.

Visit T.S. Barnett’s Amazon page HERE!

Interview with Artist/Actor Vice Verse

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, artist interview, books, chuck jett, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, frightening, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, interviews, literature, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, movie discussion, movies, new horror movies, Pro Se Press, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, scary movies, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized, vice verse on August 31, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

IMG_7150

 

The Acquired Taste is a short film written for screen and directed by Chuck Jett, creator of Empty Coffin Studio Films.  It was tastefully adapted by the short story of the same title by author and producer Alexander S. Brown.  Fans can anticipate a free viewing of the film in 2017.  It is currently being shown at conventions throughout the Southern states.  Its next appearance will be at Contraflow Convention in New Orleans, LA.

 IMG_5857

For the next interview from this dark comedy, I would like to welcome actor Vice Verse, so that he may elaborate on his part in The Acquired Taste and his life.

 

  1. What made you want to be a part of The Acquired Taste?

My good friend Charles Jett who asked me to be a part of his short horror film “Pinky Swear”, asked me if I wanted to be in “The Acquired Taste”.  I said sure.

  1. What was your experience like on set?

Had a great time on set.  Even if it was one day, I had a ball.

  1. What other projects have you been a part of?

As far as acting, I was a thespian in High School.  I had a part in the movie “Save The Last Dance”, which was edited out, and I was in the short horror film by Charles Jett, “Pinky Swear”.

  1. Are there any roles that you would turn down? Or are there any roles that would make you uncomfortable?

It depends.  Anything dealing with an Ouija board I may have to pass on. lol

  1. What role is more fun? The victim, the hero, or the villain. Why?

I would say the villain or hero.  You can use all your acting capabilities doing either of those roles.

  1. What got you into acting?

My 5th grade art teacher.  I was always in talent shows and she tapped into my talents of acting.

  1. What are some of your favorite movies?

I love all 3 Godfather movies… Glory…Any movie with Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Denzel Washington, and Don Cheadle.  One of my favorite movies is “True Romance”.

  1. Who are your favorite actors/actresses? How do you draw inspiration from them?

Well, I kind of answered that above.  But I just watch how they approach a certain character.  How they use all the nuisances they can.  I just watch and learn.

  1. Who are your favorite directors?

Hmmmmm, Spielberg, Spike Lee, Harvey Fuqua just to name a few.

  1. What future projects are you working on?

I’m an artist/songwriter and I’m working on a new EP/Album entitled “Smoke&Mirrors”…which is a concept album talking about the ups and downs artists go through in the music business.

  1. Tell us about yourself.

I’m an artist by the name of Vice Verse…a songwriter/ghostwriter. Just an all-around talented individual that you will see more of in the future.

Connect with Vice Verse by clicking on the following social media names:

Instagram

Purchase a copy of Traumatized HERE!

Watch Chuck Jett’s first short film featuring Vice Verse, PINKY SWEAR HERE!

Book Review for Forging Truth by Raymond F. Masters

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, author reviews, authors, Book Reviews, books, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, literature, Literatures, Pro Se Press, Raymond F. Masters, Read, readers, reading, Readings, south, southern authors, superheroes, Uncategorized on August 25, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

13174027_510990589102936_6044588891536481430_n

Forging Truth: The Truth Saga, Book One is a good opening for a superhero series. Although superheroes aren’t what I’m used to reading about, I was pleased that my first exploration in the genre provided enough adventure to hold my interest.

In book one, Masters spends most of his time developing characters and scenarios that I could see being crucial as the series unfolds. The characters that drew me into this tale include: Kade Truth and Caduceus. Later in the book, I found myself becoming enthralled by the female character, Mao F’Yang, which I’m hoping will receive more book time in future volumes, as she is too likable to be dismissed.

With Caduceus, I was drawn to him because of his mentor styled personality. I loved how he was stern, yet wasn’t afraid to be playful with his dialogue. Kade was also fun to read about.  He was a determined character who strived to learn and rise above. Due to his actions, and how he grew as a hero in volume 1, I am eager to see how he will continue to grow and strengthen in the following book. Although the personalities of these men were likable and felt real, I would be lying if I said they weren’t attractive. I’m not certain if the author willingly gave them sex appeal or not, but I gained a mancrush for Caduceus and Kade. Mao F’Yang is a different circumstance to why she was a favorite. Although she is mentioned very little in this book, I have a feeling she will continue to grow. For me, she has a deep sense of mystery and quirkiness that cannot be ignored.  I feel, in time, she will reveal an intriguing backstory.

With my favorite characters aside, I found myself sucked into the concept of this book. It opens with a near death experience, gives a background story regarding how the Statue of Liberty was bombed, and it provides us with villains who are capable of doing worse acts than their current crimes. But the concepts that captivated me most weren’t even the events that I spoke of. What intrigued me was how Masters focused on the never ending battle between good and evil, in a spiritual sense. Of course, our main heroes are angels. However, they do have a human background, which is revealed through flashbacks. As the story is continuing to unfold, the reader is given not only an alternative world of existence, but an existence that defies space and time.

By the conclusion of Forging Truth, I was pleased to see all of the conflict that unfolded. The book resolves very little in regards to the evil doings of the villains, and due to the loose ends being left untied, I am anticipating what the upcoming sequel has in store.

Out of a scale of 1 to 10. 1 being poor, 10 being great. I would rate Forging Truth an 8. The audiobook experience was a 6 1/2. The overall experience, between audio and story, remains at an 8.

Order Forging Truth Here!

 

 

 

Interview with Actress Chelsea Downs

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, books, chuck jett, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, interviews, literature, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, movie discussion, new horror movies, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, scary movies, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized on August 15, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

IMG_7150 

The Acquired Taste is a short film written for screen and directed by Chuck Jett, creator of Empty Coffin Studio Films.  It was tastefully adapted by the short story of the same title by author and producer Alexander S. Brown.  Fans can anticipate a free viewing of the film in 2017.  It is currently being shown at conventions throughout the Southern states.  Its next appearance will be at Contraflow Convention in New Orleans, LA.

13620975_913407655472105_4376398171153309653_n

For the fourth interview from this dark comedy, I would like to welcome actress Chelsea Downs, so that she may elaborate on her part in The Acquired Taste and her life.

  1. What made you want to be a part of The Acquired Taste?

I wanted to act in one of Chuck Jett’s movies and it happened to be Alex’s book that he was doing, so it was perfect. I also really loved the story, as well.

  1. What was your experience like on set?

It was so much fun, like a lot of friends hanging out.

  1. What other projects have you been a part of?

I haven’t been a part of any other movies.  But I help chuck Jett when he wants someone to critique his work.

  1. Are there any roles that you would turn down? Or are there any roles that would make you uncomfortable?

I don’t think so. I haven’t had much experience to know for sure just yet.

  1. What role is more fun? The victim, the hero, or the villain. Why?

I think it would be fun to be a villain, just so I can be out of my everyday element.

  1. What got you into acting?

Ever since I was little, I wanted to act. Who doesn’t want to play pretend for a living?

  1. What are some of your favorite movies?

I’ll watch pretty much anything, but my favorite movie is, Now and Then. I don’t know why, but I have always loved that movie.

  1. Who are your favorite actors/actresses? How do you draw inspiration from them?

Johnny Depp because he can be anything anyone asks him to be, and I love that.

  1. Who are your favorite directors?

Jerry Bruckheimer, I love what he did with pirate movies.  Also, Tim Burton, I love his dark side to his movies.

  1. What future projects are you working on?

Nothing as of right now.

  1. Tell us about yourself.

I’m in my late twenties. I love to cosplay and become characters, going to cons is one of my favorite things to do, it’s like hanging out with my other family. I’m a huge geek who watches any and every movie. I love reading comics and books. I’m just your geeky girl next door.

 Connect with Chelsea Downs by clicking on the following social media names:

Facebook

Purchase a copy of Traumatized HERE!

Watch Chuck Jett’s first short film, PINKY SWEAR HERE!

Interview with Director Chuck Jett

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, artist interview, books, chuck jett, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, Fiction, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, interviews, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, movie discussion, movies, new horror movies, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, scary movies, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized on August 9, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

IMG_7150

 

The Acquired Taste is a short film written for screen and directed by Chuck Jett, creator of Empty Coffin Studio Films.  It was tastefully adapted by the short story of the same title by author and producer Alexander S. Brown.  Fans can anticipate a free viewing of the film in 2017.  It is currently being shown at conventions throughout the Southern states.  Its next appearance will be at Contraflow Convention in New Orleans, LA.

 13937012_1298863880123724_803941559_n

For the third interview from this dark comedy, I would like to shine the spotlight on director Chuck Jett, so that he may elaborate on his part in The Acquired Taste and his life.

  1. What made you want to be a part of The Acquired Taste?

Originally, I was seeking a project in which pre-production could be handled in a few short weeks and filming could be done within the span of a weekend. I had some scripts in the works, and pre-planning other projects was well underway, but I had around a two-month gap to fill and badly wanted to be ­filming.

I asked my friend, horror author Alexander S. Brown, if he had anything he thought might work for a 5-15 minute short. He recommended a few of his stories that he would like (or not mind) to see in ­film.

Ultimately we zoned in on “The Acquired Taste” for a variety of reasons due to creative and pragmatic vantage points. We made a quick screenplay, ripped a lot of flesh from it, scaled it down to 2 locations without losing much of the original pertinence and it became something “doable” within the time limitations.

  1. What was your experience like on set?

In my limited experience in independent ­filmmaking, I have done some cinematography, limited amounts of directing, art direction, propmaster work, set designing, and very little editing.

For this ­film I was tasking myself with the lionshare of all of these duties and it was the ­first time I directed and did all of the ­filming simultaneously. I had lots of help from the wonderful and multi-talented actors on the set with doing makeup and general creative input.

Kerry (not in the ­film) did an amazing job as a grip, running slate (with notation) and general assistant (he is a workhorse and loaded with creativity). Everyone knew their parts and it was easy getting the performances I needed. Filmmaking is an arduous and extremely collaborative task!

  1. What other projects have you been a part of?

“Pinky Swear” was my directing debut and is still being shown in ­film festivals and has won a few awards. It will be showing in a small festival in Brookhaven, Mississippi on September 10th (2016) as an ensemble of ­films leading up to the premier of “Porches and Private Eyes”, a feature which was shot in the area by Arizona production company “Running Wild Films”, directed by Travis Mills.

Before “Pinky Swear” I worked on several independent shorts and a few features, just helping out where I could. I actually acted in a few of them, supplied art direction in others and worked crew on a few. We have a friendly and active fi­lmmaking society growing in the area.

  1. Are there any roles or manuscripts you would turn down? Why?

I won’t work on a project that I don’t believe in. I have to feel a bond with the material and feel that I can do it justice. I am in no hurry, nor do I have time or budget to tackle a feature length project at this time.

I’m not interested in “preachy” ­film projects which try to illustrate or teach a moral lesson, I simply want to entertain my viewers … or “disturb” them in some way that entertains them for a little while.

  1. Why do you enjoy filming horror?

Horror is very challenging. Finding fresh material that entertains a horror fan (Very harsh critics) is NOT easy! I hope I somewhat succeed in this notion from time-to-time. I guess the simple answer is – I LOVE HORROR; therefore, I wish to CREATE HORROR. – I’m sure there are some psychological aspects of this I’m not realizing. Lol

  1. What got you into directing?

Oddly, it just seemed like a natural transition for me. I’ve been a professional visual artist and art “DIRECTOR” since 1988ish. I’ve always loved movies (we ALL do) and have wanted to get involved in ­filmmaking for decades.

It took an actor friend of mine, Joshua “Maurice” Powell to tell me to get into fi­lmmaking. I don’t exactly remember the moment or conversation, but it was one of those “What are you waiting for?” moments. Sort of what alcoholics call a “moment of clarity” .

I come from an age where “fi­lmmaking” was not taught in college. Yes, you could get involved in “media” classes, but no real “fi­lmmaking” options were discussed much around central Mississippi in the late 1980s/ early 1990s. I was busy with my painting, drawing and design classes (I remember when the old Computer graphics typesetter was replaced by the early Apple MacIntosh) and shooting and developing my own 35mm SLR photos.

“Making Movies” was something only rich people could get training in back then, and you weren’t going to receive that training in central Mississippi. But yeah, long story short: you can get involved in ­filmmaking with very little money involved nowadays and my visual arts background has made it a fairly easy transition.

  1. What are some of your favorite movies?

Since we’re on the subject of horror, I would have to say my earliest love for the genre came from staying up late at night and watching some of the Ray Harryhausen stop motion fi­lms, and “Dark Shadows” and the old Universal Bela Lugosi ­films like “White Zombie” and of course the classic Universal takes on Dracula, Frankenstein, The Werewolf and the Invisible Man.

In my teen years I discovered Hammer Film Productions with “Dracula”, The Satanic Rites of Dracula”, etc… I immediately knew that I wanted to be Peter Cushing (well, I wanted to be Van Helsing) and Christopher Lee was an AMAZING Dracula! There are so many great horror ­films!

New ground was broken with “Night of the Living Dead”, campy, cool horror was created by “Evil Dead”, “ZombieLand” added a rebirth of this mixed genre. I actually still love to watch “Nosferatu”. “The Hills Have Eyes” (2006) is probably my favorite visual effects horror film because of their predominantly “practical” effects with just a little overlay of digital enhancement. This answer is barely scratching the surface.

  1. Who are your favorite directors and how do you draw inspiration from them?

Stanley Kubrick, Wes Craven, Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch, for starters. I draw inspiration from them primarily from watching their work and dissecting it a little, but not overly “studying” their work.

I love all the interview footage of directors and cinematographers, even from directors I’m not really familiar with. The wealth of knowledge on the internet is priceless!

  1. What future projects are you working on?

I have one finished psychological horror script of my own with production on hiatus for now. Another script I am writing is a WWII period piece of ­fiction. There is an adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell Tale Heart” I’m trying to develop now and I’m looking at the works of author Kimberly Richardson for a possible short film adaptation. There is no shortage of ideas!

  1. Tell us about yourself.

Not much to say about me. I am a creative artist currently delving into ­filmmaking. I love the collaborative nature of making films. I have been honored to have a plethora of extremely talented friends who have helped me along my creative path. I’ve learned from seasoned professionals and I’ve been taught a few things by small children at play. Wisdom wears many disguises.

I work out of my studio in Jackson, Mississippi. I call my work space “Empty Coffin Studio”. I do most of my film shoots on weekends because I have a solid day job and am nowhere near ready to leave the stability of a regular paycheck.

I paint, draw, write, sculpt and do whatever is necessary to see a project to fruition. I am very passionate, but I NEVER take myself very seriously. I enjoy the creative pathway and the creative process. I wear glasses and eat my vegetables.

Connect with Chuck Jett by clicking on the following social media names:

Facebook

Facebook FanPage

Instagram

Purchase a copy of Traumatized HERE!

Watch Chuck Jett’s first short film, PINKY SWEAR HERE!