Archive for the Halloween Category

I Have Lived to Tell About Psycho Path

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, ghosts, Halloween, Halloween Events, holidays, Horror, Horror Fans, Horror Lovers, Horror Punks, Mississippi, Mississippi Events, october, paranormal, Psycho Path Haunted Attraction, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, south, Splatterpunk on October 23, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

 

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As Halloween approaches, I have decorated my house, gathered new horror movies, and downloaded the audiobook of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow to enjoy on my back porch on Halloween Eve. Now, all I have to do is carve a few Jack O’ Lanterns, and I’ll be ready for the night when all things run amuck.  Although, I will spend my Halloween at home, I would like to share with my readers an opportunity that they will not want to miss.

Last night, I went to the haunted attraction known as Psycho Path in Ellisville, MS.  Their complete info, for those who want to visit is as follows:

Psycho Path

28 Buffalo Hill Road

Ellisville, MS 39437

Phone: 601-641-1757

Payment is cash only, no refunds.

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Myself and partner arrived early to avoid any lines, and we had the opportunity to speak with the ticket booth operator, a sweet woman by the name of Mamma Psycho.  In the time we were waiting, we learned fun facts about the path, such as how long it takes to set up and how frequently the owner changes the path, so it continues to surprise returning guests.

Before purchasing our tickets, we were warned that we could get blood, or dirt, on us.  Furthermore, Mamma Psycho stated, real weapons were used inside the path, and the actors/actresses were allowed to touch their guests, which could result in being pulled off the path.  By the way, if you visit in a large group, expect to be divided if your group is over 10 people.  The path can only take 10 people at a time, due to safety and small spaces, please respect this rule for your own safety and don’t hassle anyone about it.

When the time came to enter the path, we were led by a tour guide, who wore a bloody jumpsuit and a sack over his head.  Clutched in his right hand was a real meat hook.  His voice, guttural and menacing.  Behind us was his assistant, who was dressed as an erotic court jester from Hell.  While we followed our guide, and he spoke of the horrors that filled the woods, she took great care of us, as she informed when a dip down was coming, where roots were, holes, etc.  Because of them knowing the land that we walked upon, no one had any problems in exploration.

I won’t give away many spoliers, but I can’t describe the overall experience by keeping everything to myself.  The first scene we approached was interactive.  Our guide explained we had 30 seconds to make a choice, and the results could be to our favor, or not.  All I can say is, do it.  Open the door.

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As we ascended the path, we went through a maze that became disorienting.  This is when the actors/actresses took advantage of the darkness and came after those who are walking through.  Once past the darkest section of the path, we were brought to a grim scene dedicated to Mississippi witches.  At this stop, our guide provided a story of murder and mayhem.  Besides the typical witch burnings, or hangings, one might expect to hear about, the story he told was unique and chilling.

From this attraction to the next, we had more actors/actresses attack, until we came to a location that harbored a bedframe with a sinister history.  The story that our guide provided for this relic is sure to make one feel like they are staring the devil in the eye.

Next, we were presented with a school bus, which we were told to load upon and sit.  Here, we received a story that is perhaps one of the most unsettling tales I have ever heard in a tour, which also provides, names, location, ages, and accuracy on the horrors that had happened on this bus.  As I listened to the tragedy that befell one poor girl, I couldn’t help but feel myself growing anxious with vibes that urged I was partaking in something forbidden.

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After leaving the bus, if you haven’t already run for the hills, be sure your shoelaces are tied, because running will be important for the final scene.  After surviving the path, I was so excited about what I had experienced, I inquired with one of the actresses if the stories they told were true, or if they were just part of the show.  The actress confirmed, “Both, the stories are part of the show, but they are also true.”  Furthermore, she spoke about experiencing paranormal activity on the path, and how she lacked a rational explanation to debunk what had happened.

For the first time in a decade, I have experienced a truly frightening attraction, and I have no one else but the crew of Psycho Path to thank.  Prior to attending this haunt, I had no idea that not only would I receive scares, but I would explore a property that had collected haunted objects.  The overall experience made me feel like I had just walked through the Mississippi version of the infamous Warren’s Occult Museum.

Despite how intense this attraction is, it is family friendly.  However, if you have children who are inexperienced to horror, scares, or ghastly tales, I would suggest finding a babysitter.  Since this is a family friendly event, NO alcohol, bullying, or fighting is allowed on the premises.  Respect these rules and you will be able to experience the path in its full, adrenaline rushing glory.

Here are the links one can follow regarding Psycho Path:

Facebook

Youtube

 

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Dancing Devil Shot Recipe

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, drink recipes, drinks, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, Halloween, Halloween Books, halloween recipes, holidays, Horror, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, literature, Mississippi, mississippi authors, Mississippi Horror Author, Read, readers, reading, Readings, south, southern authors, The Night The Jack O Lantern Went Out, Uncategorized on October 8, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

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I created another shot recipe for my new bestselling book, The Night the Jack O’ Lantern Went Out. Because of the online shares I have received, here’s something devilish to make you dance.

Dancing Devil Shot:

1/2 tsp Fireball

Half Praline Liquor

Half Cherry Bourbon

Sprinkle lightly with nutmeg.

Enjoy!

This shot was inspired by my short story, The Fire Watcher, which is featured in TNTJWO.

For those who are unfamiliar with TNTJWO, this book is a collection of 13 vintage Halloween stories that are themed around folklore, customs, and superstitions. On its release date, it was ranked in the top 100 under the 3 bestseller lists on http://www.Amazon.com.

Lists include:

Ebooks

#19 Horror Short Stories

#88 Genre Fiction/ Holidays

Books

#93 Holidays

TNTJWO is already on its way to becoming a holiday cult classic with young adults and adults.  Order your paperback or ebook by clicking HERE.

View a teaser trailer HERE.

Jack O’ Lantern Shot Recipe

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, books, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, drink recipes, drinks, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, frightening, Gay Horror Authors, Halloween, Halloween Books, halloween recipes, holidays, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, interviews, investigation, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, october, paranormal, Pro Se Press, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scarticia, scary, south, southern authors, spirits, The Night The Jack O Lantern Went Out, Uncategorized with tags on September 27, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

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Last night, I shared online that I concocted a secret shot recipe for my new book, The Night the Jack O’ Lantern Went Out.

I offered to reveal that recipe, if TNTJWO was shared over 13+ times. Due to everyone’s support and love, here is my secret recipe.

Jack O’ Lantern Shot

Rim shot glass with:

Maple Syrup & Brown Sugar

Fill shot glass with:

Half Pumpkin Vodka

Half Amaretto Liquor

Enjoy!

For those who are unfamiliar with TNTJWO, this book is a collection of 13 vintage Halloween stories that are themed around folklore, customs, and superstitions. On its release date, it was ranked in the top 100 under 3 bestseller lists on www.Amazon.com.

Lists include:

Ebooks

#19 Horror Short Stories

#88 Genre Fiction/ Holidays

Books

#93 Holidays

TNTJWO is already on its way to becoming a holiday cult classic with young adults and adults. Order your paperback or ebook by clicking HERE.

View a teaser trailer HERE.

 

 

Ever Wondered How Those Stories Get Started?

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, books, cult books, cult classic, Cult horror, Dark Oak Press, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, Gay Horror Authors, Halloween, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized, werewolf, werewolves on September 14, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

Happy Werewolf Wednesday!  Instead of Instagraming/Facebooking/Twittering werewolf jokes today, as usual, I decided to address some reoccurring questions that readers had about my novel Syrenthia Falls.  For those who haven’t read my novel, don’t worry, my answers shouldn’t give away any major spoilers, and if you like what you see, Amazon links will be provided at the conclusion of my blog.  If you have never read Syrenthia Falls, this is what you can expect:

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Syrenthia is a teenage misfit who has never tasted friendship or romance. She has always been typecast as a wallflower, black sheep, and bookworm. Near the beginning of her senior year, she is befriended by Sarah who introduces her to a group of classmates that accept her as is.

Syrenthia quickly learns that this group of free spirited teenagers shares her strongest interest, urban legends. Each day, she learns more and more about a place called “The Falls” where someone or something has terrorized the land for years and only those with a death wish dare to venture out.

Upon arrival, the friends see that “The Falls” is nothing more than a swimming hole, a sandbar, and a waterfall. All is fun and games, until night falls. Once the full moon shines overhead, they are faced with a monstrous beast that is savage and extremely hungry. Only two people survive, one escapes unharmed, the other, Syrenthia, is not so lucky. However, over the passing weeks, Syrenthia grows to be a powerful and dangerous force. One by one her enemies are subjected to her wrath.

Now, the questions:

 “What makes your werewolf novel stand out among the rest?” 

I hear this question frequently.  Even when I pitched Syrenthia Falls to Dark Oak Press, I had to quickly explain why this book should be published, and how it differed from other novels.  I started my pitch with a mistake.  Nervous, I took a deep breath and blurted, “This book is the first in a series and the main character is the town itself.”

My publisher replied, “Yeah, that hasn’t been done before.”

Still, I had the floor. I agreed with him, and admitted that having a town as the main character was a common theme among the genre.  Since the ice was now broken, I felt like I had nothing left to lose.  I continued, “Syrenthia Falls is a werewolf novel set in suburbia.  In a sense, it’s like Stephen King’s Carrie meets An American Werewolf in London.  The werewolf is a metaphor.  It regards the beast that dwells within each of us and how that beast can become provoked.  That’s why with my novel, I have manipulated the werewolf subgenre so that it is presented as a retelling of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.”

With my publisher’s interest piqued, I now felt more confident.  I continued, “To avoid the werewolf cliché, I researched Voodoo, Satanism, and European superstitions.  In my research, I have found unique folklore and philosophies that I have used to construct my modern day beast.”

Although he wasn’t entirely sold, he did say, “Send it over and I’ll look at it.”

Months later, after emailing Dark Oak Press my manuscript, I received my acceptance letter.

“What fun facts can you tell me about your book?”

Some people who have read Syrenthia Falls, might wonder why I have described some characters who don’t show back up in this volume.  Trust, there is a reason for this, they have their own story.  In time, they will have their own book.  Again, the town is the main character and this town (Havensburg) has many residents and many dark secrets.  In the following Havensburg books, I plan to introduce new characters, lifestyles, scenarios, and classic creatures while breathing new life into them.

As I earlier noted, my werewolf was inspired by Voodoo, Satanism, and European superstitions and philosophies.  Prior to writing Syrenthia Falls, I had read a book called Voodoo Secrets by Heike Owusu.  This book had a segment in it, where it spoke of how werewolves detested bitter blood, and the two elements that made the blood bitter were coffee or tea.  It noted that by purging oneself with coffee or tea, one’s blood would gain a bitter smell that would act as a repellent against the werewolf.  When utilizing this information, I decided to go a step further and make the tea a weapon, such as silver.

I researched Levayan Satanism when I decided to dive into Syrenthia’s thoughts.  When I was surfing the web one day, I stumbled upon an interview that Bob Larson provided to Zeena Levay and Nikolas Schreck.  In this interview, I learned what their fundaments were and I found it interesting on how human based they had made their commandments. These are the fundamentals that I loosely elaborated upon in her thought process.

For the final touch, I returned to the root of werewolf folklore – Europe.  In my research, I learned of a formula that occult practitioners would concoct when wanting to transform into a werewolf.  So that I could birth my physical monster, I read of how these practitioners utilized herbs, wolf skins, salves, and chanting to create something bloodthirsty.  What I found most interesting is that opium had been used in their transformation spell.

“I thought the book was young adult, but it ended up being adult.”

This was a complaint that I received in a review.  Things like this happen.  However, just because a novel features teenagers, doesn’t mean it is young adult related.  But, truth be it, this was a concern I had when writing the novel.  When creating the characters, I couldn’t see them being anyone other than a group of teenagers, as I wanted to focus on peer pressure, child abuse, bullying, and coming of age.  Yet, although I focused on these subjects, the book is intended for adults only.

Who are your favorite characters?”

Each of my lead characters are based off of people I know, so I favor all of them.

Sarah is one of my favorites, as she grows from being an abused child, to being a fighter.  Writing Sarah was a touchy subject.  I based her off of a high school friend who suffered sexual abuse while we were in school.  During our school years, I watched her go from being a victim, to becoming a heroine.

My favorite character, of course, is Syrenthia.  The reason being is because I could identify with her as a person who was once a shy outcast.  The emotions and feelings she experiences make her a grey character and someone that people can either sympathize or empathize with.  The fact that she is the embodiment of good and evil, makes her more interesting.

“Why did you name your book Syrenthia Falls when the character is named Syrenthia and there is a location called Owen Falls?  The two don’t go together.”

I have been asked this on occasion and actually, the two go very well together.  The title regards Syrenthia descending a downward spiral.  As the reader progresses in the book, they see how she slowly unravels more and more until there is very little of the real Syrenthia left.  The waterfall also plays a great factor in this novel, as this is where Syrenthia begins her downward spiral, and in many cultures, water is seen as a symbol of transformation and rebirth.

“Why should I buy your book?”

Syrenthia Falls is a novel that I feel won’t disappoint you and I feel it is something that will renew the age old legend of the werewolf.  It is a piece of literature that has currently inspired artwork by Courtney Vice and tea by Kimberly Richardson.  Links are listed below so you may purchase my book and the inspired art and tea.

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Click each name to be redirected to the page of your liking.

Courtney Vice’s Facebook Page

Viridian Tea Company

Dark Oak Press (Free chapter of Syrenthia Falls Here).

Syrenthia Falls purchase link.  Available in paperback, hardback, and ebook.

Alexander S. Brown Facebook

Alexander S. Brown Instagram

Alexander S. Brown Twitter

Artist Jason Hardy Speaks of Halloween and Suggests Some Great Horror Classics

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, artist interview, bayou con, entertainment, Halloween, holidays, Horror, interviews, Jason Hardy, Lousiana Arts, scary with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 31, 2014 by Alexander S. Brown

Two years ago in Lake Charles, LA I met an artist known as Jason Hardy.  It was during our time at Bayou Con that we began sharing our fandom of Halloween.  With his many works of art that contribute to the genres of horror, fantasy, and sci-fi, he also features pieces that are Halloween themed.  On the side, he writes and I have been lucky enough to enjoy his book of Halloween poetry.  As we approach the witching hour the night before Halloween, I present to you Jason Hardy.

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Mr. Hardy describes his life as, “I was born one Halloween night which is why my mom still screams a lot. While it would be awesome if the preceding was true I may burn in the hockey stick store if I don’t admit it’s not. I was born on JFK’s birthday. Or maybe it’s on the day he was shot which may account for my occasional paranoia. Flash forward to today and I still live about three blocks from where JFK, I mean the doctor, yanked me out. I’m a high school teacher living in my hometown of Kaplan in the heart of Cajun country in Louisiana. I am at present 54 years of age which is a lot of mileage but my dip stick still gets the job done. I drive a pickup truck which fits rather well in my Mayberry sort of town. I graduated from LSU a horrifying number of years ago. In my free time outside the classroom I am an artist and poet (though an inordinate amount of people don’t know it…that was a gratis rhyme to show I can do it). I always wanted to be a professional writer or artist but I ended up teaching kids instead which is fine. As long as they can draw a dandy stick figure and correctly spell my name below it I’m good. I have published one poem in my lifetime in Ellery Queen Mystery magazine many years ago. It paid $30 so it’s really no mystery why I did not immediately head for Vegas. As is obviously evident my writing and art is generally humorous. I don’t do landscapes unless they are on Venus or a convenient graveyard. I have done an occasional bird. Which sounds dirty but isn’t. Despite not being a Halloween baby (see above) it remains my favorite holiday. Pumpkins oddly enough don’t frighten me, although a pumpkin boy named Linus might. When I retire from going to school nearly my entire life in a few years I plan to write young adult fiction. Since I’ve been around them so much and survived. Maybe with an evil nun tossed in to commemorate my Catholic school days. I have a black cat named Raven after Mr. Poe who threatened me with an injunction if I did not mention him. He is deweinered but not declawed so I tend to listen. I live in a house built in 1945 but only dated Rosie the Rivetor briefly. In closing, it still pisses me off that we have to pay the Russians to get off the planet earth. I love to collect books and statues which makes me feel better about the Russians.”

What does Halloween mean to you?

Halloween means nostalgia to me. Takes my frequently addled adult mind back to a more innocent, fun time. Lots of good memories. Back to a time when the only terrorists were the kids brave enough to throw eggs at someone’s house or light the infamous poo-bag.

What is your most memorable Halloween?

Most memorable moment was ironically the last. The dreaded night when because of advanced age I was banned from trick or treating. Oh, the horror! So what’s a kid to do? Sneak out, that’s what. Pathetic costume: knit NFL team hat and football. Desperate strategy: Quick end runs to the closest houses for that final, forbidden candy fix. Approximate age: fifteen give or take a tootsie roll. It was bittersweet, clandestine fun. Although I couldn’t spell “clandestine” back then.

What was your best Halloween costume?

Given the time period, probably a hobo of some sort. Down and dirty. Back then we mostly wore the classic plastic store bought masks with the elastic string that would sting your ears.

What was your worst Halloween costume?

It wasn’t on me. A kid I knew and probably subtly bullied in the neighborhood dressed as a blue UPS mailbox one year. With the slit to see through. Actually very creative at the time. But we pushed him over mercilessly since his visibility was marginal. We thought about but did not actually pee through the slit. Nobody likes wet mail.

Some believe Halloween is negative.  Why do you believe this is so?

Obviously because it began as a Catholic holiday and soon became much darker. To me it’s just fun. No religious motif involved for this boy. Oh, and the legend of the razor blades didn’t help.

What do you do on Halloween to keep the ghosts and ghouls away on Halloween?

I leave my porch light on. Which in the old days would have made me the mean-ass old man of the neighborhood who would rather pay his light bill than spend a dime on candy. Of course with today’s wussy Halloween, even if I leave the porch light off only a few kids would bother to show up. And even then it’s still daylight!

What scares you?

I find myself occasionally scared by spiders, lack of toilet paper, Opera, Little Debbie going out of business or continuing to shrink and the disappearance of thongs from the world. Mostly spiders.

What are your favorite scary movies?

Monster Squad, Alien, Something Wicked, Trick R Treat, The Thing, The Innocents, Scared Stiff.

What are some of your favorite horror books?

Something Wicked by a wicked mile (again nostalgic for me), Nightmare Factory, Our Lady of Darkness, At the Mountains of Madness, The Shining.

Do you prefer fast paced or slow burners?

I prefer moderately paced books that threaten to burn my butt. Which thrills me.

Who are your inspirations?

I’ve been inspired over the years by HPL, REH, Fritz Leiber, various movies and memories.

Do you plan to contribute to the horror genre in the future?

I may have another horror story in me. If I not drained dry by a horny vampires first. Which in the long run may not be too bloody terrible. I plan to write more when I retire. At the moment I continue to write generally humorous horror poems for fun. I would love to be published in Weird Tales before I die so that when I run into HPL and his black cat someday I can say, “Me too, beee-acch!”

Where can we find your work?

My art can be found lurking on my Facebook page at the moment. Also all over the floor of my “art studio” where my black cat can lounge his lazy ass all over it as a feline critique. My humorous poetry books can be found in a rather lonely corner of Lulu online. When I sell one I feel closer to retirement, but only marginally so. Which is spooky.

Paranormal Investigator, Horror Author, and Spiritualist Kalila Smith Speaks of Halloween

Posted in author interviews, books, ghosts, Halloween, Horror, Horror Book, interviews, kalilah smith, literature, louisiana author, new orleans, new orleans author, october, paranormal, reading with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2014 by Alexander S. Brown

Kalila Smith has been a name imbedded in my head since I experienced the New Orleans Ghost Tours.  The first book of hers I ever bought was New Orleans Ghosts, Voodoo, and Vampires and I was hooked since.  For years, I had wanted to meet her and when I opened the guidelines for Southern Haunts: Spirits that Walk Among Us, I was beyond thrilled to work with her.  The first time I met her face to face was at a convention and we just happened to bump into one another.  We had that pause moment, where we looked at one another like we had known each other for a lifetime.  Then after a huge hug, we immediately clicked, and I have her to thank for my level of spirituality that I now have.  It is my greatest pleasure to interview a woman that I highly respect and that I feel is perfect to feature on my blog during the week of Halloween!

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Kalila was born and raised in New Orleans. She personally researched and wrote the material featured on Haunted History Tours of New Orleans’ Ghost, Vampire and Spellbound tours. She is the author of New Orleans Ghosts, Voodoo, & Vampires, and Tales from the French Quarter, and Miami’s Dark Tales.  Her newest book is Afterlife Mysteries Revealed.

Her work as an intuitive psychic has been recognized for over 2 decades worldwide.

She has been featured on and worked behind the scenes on  television productions including Travel Daily, Places of Mystery, Secret New Orleans, Unsolved Mysteries, FEAR!, MTV’s On The Road, Blind Date, Hidden New Orleans, Urban Legends, America’s Most Haunted Places, In Search of…, and Supernatural Destinations. She appeared in the motion picture, “The St. Francisville Experience.” She wrote and directed “Journey Into Darkness… The Trilogy”, a video documentary, featured in segment in television broadcast in the US & UK.  And worked on and appeared in the documentary for Sony’s Playstation II game, Ghosthunter. She conducted all of the paranormal investigations for the local television show, “Haunted New Orleans.” She was a producer in the PBS documentary “Southern Haunts” New Orleans episode produced by Sky Dive Films.

Several of her true crime stories were featured in articles in Examiner.com and the National Crime and Punishment Museum Blog page.

Check out her short story “The Bequest” in Southern Haunts; Spirits That Walk Among Us.   Another short story, “The Devil’s Doorway” will be featured in the second Southern Haunts Anthology, and “Bayou Loup,” a werewolf story featured in “Luna’s Children,” a werewolf anthology.

What does Halloween mean to you?

Halloween is when the veil between our world and the spirit world is the thinnest.

What is your most memorable Halloween?

My most memorable Halloweens are the ones I shared with my kids when they were little.

What was your best Halloween costume? 

I was so busy one year, I just didn’t costume. I didn’t have time, I was worn out but then felt bad that I didn’t take part in the festivities.   When I got to work, I ran to Walgreens’ and picked up some cheap Halloween makeup and put white on my face and dark under my eyes and called myself a zombie!  I did my tours that night and everyone loved it!

What was your worst Halloween costume? 

A couple of years ago I did Medusa with plastic snakes and a wig.  The snakes were painted with a paint that caused my sinuses to close up and the bobby pins were stabbing me in the head.  It turned into the worst headache of my life.  Never again!

How do you celebrate Halloween today?

I work and I have worked on Halloween doing ghost tours, séances and readings for 19 years now.

Some people believe Halloween is a negative Holiday to celebrate. Why do you feel Halloween has such a controversy to it? 

Hollywood is usually to blame for giving a bad name to anything mysterious turning into something dark and evil.

What do you do to keep the ghost and ghouls away on Halloween night?

Well, we do séances and of course say prayers and sing to raise the vibration to keep lower vibrational spirits away.

What frightens you and why? 

New Orleans’ cockroaches.  Why? They fly.

What’s your favorite scary movie and why? 

One of my favorites that scared me beyond words was the Jeepers Creepers. Being stranded on a deserted country road with a monster after you, is pretty creepy. But I’m a classic horror buff. I like old school horror and anything Stephen King!

What’s your favorite horror book and why?

Cujo by Stephen King because as I read it, it was as if I was there.   During the car scene I actually felt very trapped and claustrophobic.   He really made that character come to life and it’s so frightening because it could actually happen.  What can be scarier?

Do you prefer slow burners or fast paced thrillers?

Both!  Just scare me!

What inspires your more frightening work? 

Legends I heard growing up in the bayous of South Louisiana.   I grew up hearing some really scary stories about ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and other monsters.

Do you plan to contribute to the horror genre in the future?

Absolutely! In fact, I’m sitting on a couple of short stories waiting for the right anthology to come along.

Where can we find your work?

www.kalilasmith.com    http://http://darkoakpress.com

Find Out What Scares Horror Author Michael West

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, author interviews, books, frightening, Halloween, Horror, Horror Authors, Horror Book, indiana authors, interviews, literature, michael west, october, scary with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2014 by Alexander S. Brown

Nearly, a year ago I had the pleasure of speaking with Michael West.  This introduction was when we began assisting with the podcast known as The Star Chamber Show.  It wasn’t until last September that I had the opportunity to meet him at an event known as Imaginarium.  Although we had the pleasure of speaking many times prior, it was here that we began fanboying out over the horror genre.  With his knowledge regarding scares and monstrosities, I am pleased to have horror author, Michael West on my blog.

 Michael

Michael West is the bestselling author of Cinema of Shadows, The Wide Game, Spook House, Skull Full of Kisses, and the critically-acclaimed Legacy of the Gods series. He lives and works in the Indianapolis area with his wife, their two children, their turtle, Gamera, and their dog, King Seesar.

His children are convinced that spirits move through the woods near their home.

What does Halloween mean to you?

Halloween has always been a special time of year for me.  When I was a child, it was the fun of dressing up and getting free candy, sure, but it was also a time of year where Horror was actually celebrated.  Turn on just about any TV channel and find a scary movie or Halloween-themed show.  Stores are filled with monster masks and other spooky items.  Creepy, ghoulish stuff is everywhere.  I guess it all comes down to the fact that this is the one time of the year that I don’t feel like an outcast.

What is your most memorable Halloween?

I’ve had so many memorable Halloweens.  It’s hard to pick just one.

How do you celebrate Halloween today?

We normally put on a Haunted House in my garage and then have a pizza party for all my friends and family who help me pull it off.  Leading up to the big night, I watch Horror films on AMC and my brother usually holds a themed Halloween Party that I really enjoy.

What was your best Halloween costume?

My best costume was probably me Devil costume from 1991.  I carved cloven hooves out of wood and did actual prosthetic make-up.  That one went over really well and I won Best Costume at a few Halloween parties that year.

What was your worst Halloween costume?

There were a few Halloweens when we lived in an apartment and I worked for a movie theater.  I had to work on Halloween night, so my costume was my manager’s uniform. That was my worst for sure.

Some people believe Halloween is a negative holiday to celebrate.  Why do you feel Halloween has such a controversy to it?

Some see Halloween as a celebration of darkness and Evil with a capital “E.”  I don’t see it that way at all.  I see it as good, ol’ fun.

What do you do to keep the ghosts and ghouls away on Halloween night?

Usually, I watch Halloween.

What frightens you and why?

Two of my biggest fears are spiders and being eaten alive, which keep popping up in my fiction too.  I don’t know when the fears started or why.  I’ve had them as long as I can remember.  The other major fear I have is that something will happen to someone I love.  If you love someone, you know what that fear is like.  This person is your world, and the thought of losing them, of what the world would be like with them not in it, is just too horrible to even consider.

What’s your favorite scary movie and why?

John Carpenter’s Halloween.  It is just about the perfect scare machine.  The lighting, the cinematography, the acting, the score.  Oh, that score.  It just isn’t really Halloween until I sit down to watch it.

What’s your favorite horror book and why?

Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot.  King introduces to us some of the most memorable, likeable, characters, people you really get to know and feel a connection with, and then he puts them through Hell.  I’ve read it a half a dozen times over the years, and the passage where the vampire child is clawing at the window, begging to be let in, still makes my blood run cold.

Do you prefer slow burners or fast paced thrillers?

I like both.  Actually, my favorite stories start off as a slow burn and then end with fast paced, action – packed climaxes.

What inspires your more frightening work?

Sometimes it is a news story.  Other times, an idea just hits me when I least expect it.  Some are based on my own fears and the fears of people I know, and still others are inspired by events from my life.  The car accident from The Wide Game, for example, was based on an actual event that happened to me back in 1987.

Do you plan to contribute to the horror genre in the future?

I never set out to write a Horror story.  I like to say that everything I write is a love story, except the thing that threatens to drive people apart is not your normal everyday problems, but the supernatural.  All of my stories tend to have some dark slant to them, so yes, I see my work to continue to involve Horror in one fashion or another.

Where can we find your work?

You can find my work at my website, http://www.bymichaelwest.com

My publisher’s website, http://www.seventhstarpress.com/  and on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Kobo.