Archive for the horror art Category

Review for the Horror Movie ‘Incall’

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Brock Riebe, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, frightening, gay artist, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Fans, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Incall Horror Movie, Incall Movie, Independent Horror, movie discussion, movie review, movies, new horror movies, scary movies on February 24, 2017 by Alexander S. Brown

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I just had the pleasure of viewing the cult movie ‘Incall’ written and directed by Brock Riebe. For those unfamiliar with this underground flick, it’s a homoerotic horror thriller. Throughout its 2hr + runtime, it stands alone as its own movie while honoring presiding cult classics.  Multiple elements within its production, acting, and writing reflect the styles of indie masters such as: Paul Bartel, Roger Corman, and David DeCoteau.

Incall opens with the lead character, Kasey, visiting his mother’s grave.  Kneeling before her tombstone, he speaks of frustrations regarding work, finances, and the general public.  After relaying his troubles, he prays to her spirit, asking her to provide him with a means of escaping the rut he has become trapped in.

Upon walking home, he crosses paths with a charismatic man who we later discover is thief named Marco.  At first, they continue opposite ways, until a shared chemistry stops Kasey who admires Marco walking away.  In response, Marco stops, turns, and smiles at Kasey. By how this is orchestrated, we can conclude their passing is caused by fate, or a supernatural force.

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The next 30 minutes, or so, delivers character development and a background story. By day, Kasey is a bill collector.  At night, he is an inhouse massage therapist who is frequently propositioned by horny, old men.  Remaining professional, he declines their advances despite the money being offered.

In his private time, he journals in a back room at a coffee shop.  Although he intends to stay antisocial, a character named Beth frequently interrupts his secluded visits.  By little screen time, we can see her character is built to have a pestering, noisy disposition, which lacks in communication skills.  An example of this can be seen as Kasey clearly wants to be left alone, yet she continues talking about herself.  Rather than being cruel, Kasey tolerates her company.

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Now with an emotional platform established, the action begins.  One night, Kasey is propositioned by another elderly client.  Trying to remain business professional, he attempts making excuses so the client will leave.  The man, who won’t take no for an answer, pushes himself onto Kasey, causing a scuffle.  During their struggle, one wrong move results in the client’s accidental death.

Uncertain of what to do, or how to react, Kasey is overcome by a numb aftershock that causes him to drink himself to sleep.  The next morning, he goes to work, leaving the corpse where it lay, until he can decide on its disposal method.  Meanwhile, Marco breaks into Kasey’s apartment, finding the dead body. Instead of letting sleeping dogs lie, Marco later confronts Kasey with an irresistible proposition.

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Overall, I enjoyed Incall.  What made the movie stand out for me were the mixture of diverse psychological and spiritual components.  The most fascinating aspect was how Incall commented on emotionally broken characters coming together.  Example: dialogue reveals Kasey’s father is a felon and Marco’s father was abusive. Although it’s not blatant that Beth has daddy issues, she shows characteristics by how she pushes herself on guys and her inability to walk away from her cheating, abusive boyfriend.  Perhaps one of the conveying messages in Incall remarks on the father figure?  Perhaps this shared conflict is one reason why fate has brought the trio together.  However, I believe the main reason for them being acquainted is due to Kasey praying to his mother’s spirit. I speculate this because Marco and Beth eventually provide the necessary tools that Kasey has prayed for.

A final aspect I enjoyed was the gray character development.  No one in this movie is truly good or evil.  Rather they are human, trying to survive a day at a time. Because of their complexity, and ability to have viewers empathize or sympathize, the creator has provided his audience with emotional gold.

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From a scale of 1 to 10. 1 being the worst and 10 being the best, I rate this an 8. Incall is a speculative piece that pays homage to B movie classics, the characters have synchronicity, and the director has a photogenic eye. When Incall receives a DVD release, I plan to include it to my library.

Connect with Incall via Facebook by clicking HERE.

Visit the Incall website by clicking HERE

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Blaxploitation Horror Classics

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, blaxploitation, blaxploitation cinema, blaxploitation horror, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, frightening, Horror, horror art, Horror Fans, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Independent Horror, movie discussion, movie review, movies, scary, scary movies on February 11, 2017 by Alexander S. Brown

With February being Black History Month, I wanted to write about a sub-genre that doesn’t receive the spotlight it deserves.  Rather than focus on movies that might be too contemporary, or mainstream, I would like to start at the beginning.  Below is a list of five Blaxploitation classics that have gained cult followings, and have laid the stepping stones for modern day African American horror cinema.

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House on Skull Mountain is an underrated gem with a simple premise.  The movie begins with a mambo by the name of Pauline Christophe who dies from old age in her home.  Upon her passing, the heirs to her estate arrive at her mansion to receive their inheritance.  Once gathered, each family member is terrorized and murdered by a supernatural power summoned by a bokor.

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Although I’m sure the scenery in this classic won’t creep out today’s younger generation, there are quite a few chilling shots and set designs.  Examples include: the land formation of Skull Mountain and the burial scene in the family cemetery.  Even the architecture and decoration of the mansion itself felt brooding and empty.  Overall, the entire property is a true stereotype to the word “haunting” in every aspect of its definition.  Furthermore, to increase the viewer’s tension, the director provides optical illusions, that subliminally keeps us observant of the architecture and character’s environment.

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Not only is there gothic eye candy galore, the movie is packed with symbolism.  A good portion of the symbols presented are self-explanatory, such as the hooded figure representing death, or the snake (whereas here it represents evil, rather than Damballa who is synchronized with positive entities.)  Yet, there are a few enigmatic segments.  The crow dropping a charm onto Pauline Christophe’s grave requires more interpretation from the viewer.  In some customs, the crow represents life magic, adaptability, and destiny.  The charm it drops is a voodoo symbol for death.  Also, this scene foreshadows later conflict.  Midway through the feature, we see a caged crow.  Although this could be interpreted many ways, my mind perceived it as symbolism representing repressed life, discomfort, and being restrained from one’s destiny.

Despite this being hailed as a part of the Blaxploitation genre, I feel it should take a step further and become known as Gothic Horror due to its style and set design.

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I hesitated on seeing Blacula for quite some time, because I had yet to develop a taste for campy cinema.  However, upon viewing it, I found myself quickly engrossed due its pacing, plot, and symbolism.

In this re-imaging of Bram Stoker’s masterpiece, Blacula opens with a strong reflection on slavery.  After Prince Mamuwalde and his bride, Luva, travel to Transylvania to convince the infamous Count Dracula to end the slave trade, Dracula transforms Mamuwalde into a vampire.  Such as what any slave master would do to his slaves, Dracula strips Mamuwalde’s of his African name and mockingly dubs him, Blacula.  Next, Count Dracula traps him in a coffin and leaves Luva to die in captivity.  Two centuries later, a gay interracial couple are snooping around a warehouse where they accidentaly release Blacula from his coffin.  Once free, Blacula goes on a killing spree where he encounters Tina, who happens to be the reincarnation of Luva.

One reason I appreciate this film is due to the decisions that were made while filming.  Originally, Blacula’s name was to be Andrew Brown.  Yet, actor William Marshall demanded that the character have dignity.  Because of Mr. Marshall, the concept of Andrew Brown was scrapped, and the backstory of Mamuwalde was born.  Also, the choice of a rhythm and blues soundtrack was a good decision.  It keeps the viewer drawn into the theme of the 70s, rather than the horror elements.

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Another reason I appreciate Blacula is because it is a solid horror movie.  Neverminding how some of the makeup isn’t top notch, the director redeems himself by providing suspenseful timing for scares.  A perfect example of this is the morgue scene where one of Blacula’s victims rises from a gurney, runs down the hall, and attacks the mortician.  In the few seconds this vampire is on camera, she is wide eyed with animalistic rage, her hair is disheveled, and her screaming mouth reveals a set of lethal fangs.  To this day, I can’t figure out why this moment is so effective.  I have been torn between questioning if it’s the makeup, the slow-motion filming, or a mixture of both.  Without a doubt, this vampire is what nightmares are made of.

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Throughout the movie, Blacula embodies an iconic physical and emotional character.  In some ways, his character design pays a greater homage to the literary Dracula compared to other movies.  In the book, Stoker provides brief description of Dracula’s facial hair.  Opposed to Gary Oldman’s Dracula who kept a gentleman’s mustache, William Marshall provides a facial canvas that is monstrously highlighted by bizarre hair patterns, which ends up being nightmare fuel.

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Abby is a movie that I was surprised to hear mentioned when I inquired on my social media about Blaxploitation Horror.  For years, it has been one of those hidden gems that I loved, but I thought no one else knew of its existence.   I can’t help but think Warner Bros. is to blame for is limited audience, since WB sued American International Pictures on grounds of copyright issues.  Because of the squabble surrounding Abby ripping off of The Exorcist, this movie fell into a premature grave that wasn’t resurrected until years later.  Despite Warner Bros. winning the infringement lawsuit, one would have to grasp at straws to see a deep connection between Abby and The Exorcist.

Abby begins with Dr. Williams (Abby’s father in law, played by William Marshall) lecturing his class about the entity named Eshu.  For his minimal explanation, we learn Eshu is a trickster, a creator of whirlwinds, and chaos.  Research proves this brief description is accurate.  However, research also explains Eshu’s duty is to ensure that the world maintains balance.  To obtain this balance, Eshu provokes chaos.

Next, Dr. Williams visits Nigeria and finds a puzzle box hidden within a cave he is excavating.  Upon opening the box, he unleashes the very spirit he earlier lectured about.  As coincidental as this sounds, the world of occultism shows there are 101 paths to Eshu.  After the spirit is released, it travels across the Atlantic Ocean where it arrives in America and possesses Abby.  Throughout the feature, it’s never explains why the spirit chooses Abby as its host.  However, since Abby is married to a reverend, and her father in law is also ordained, one can assume Abby’s possession is because she’s the closest of kin to Dr. Williams who isn’t a minister.

The movie does progress without conformation if the spirit possessing Abby’s body is actually Eshu or not.  Even at one point, Dr. Williams speculates the spirit isn’t actually Eshu.  Instead, it is an impostor.  Other than Dr. Williams uncovering the possessed artifact, and the speculation of whether or not the spirit possessing Abby is an impostor, there are no other connections I could depict between this movie and The Exorcist.

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Overall, Abby is fun.  Some of the makeup designs aren’t great, and once possessed, some of Abby’s dialogue sounds suitable for the spoof skit SNL did of The Exorcist.  By no means would I call this movie scary or grotesque.  Instead, it’s a fun installment in the Blaxploitation sub-genre that does deserve to be watched late at night with a group of friends.  Rarely do I ever say this, but I would be interested to see Abby remade.

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J.D.’s Revenge is a movie I had considered watching throughout my life, but I recently settled on viewing it prior to this blog.  The plot focuses on a New Orleans resident named Isaac.  One night when he and his girlfriend Christella are on a date, they attend a hypnosis act where he volunteers to be hypnotized.  When Isaac has successfully reached a trance state, he becomes the unwilling host of a hustler who died in the 1940s known as J.D.  With Isaac gradually acquiring more of J.D.’s mannerisms, J.D. eventually becomes the dominant inhabitant of Isaac’s body, resulting in attempted rape, murder, and exacting revenge upon those who murdered him and his sister, Betty Jo.

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Out of all of the movies on this list, I felt this one had the least to offer in regards to content.  Still, I enjoyed the movie as a period piece and a thriller.  Besides J.D.’s Revenge, being exactly what it is, a man possessed by a vengeful hustler, there aren’t any deep metaphors, or real social commentary to philosophize on.  With food for thought being limited, I suggest audiences to leave their brain at the door, relax, and enjoy this as a supernatural thriller.  The concept is simple, the cast is well put together, and there are quite a few fun one liners throughout.

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Sugar Hill is a movie I immediately fell in love with upon viewing.  The plot follows an upcoming voodoo princess named Sugar Hill.  After a gang murders her boyfriend because he refuses to sell his nightclub, Sugar Hill visits a voodoo queen named Mama Maitreese for help.  Once explaining the circumstance, Mama introduces her to Baron Samedi, who provides her with a gang of zombies to exact her revenge.  With the basis simplistic, this allows a greater concentration on the social commentary, which focuses on racism.

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This Blaxploitation classic is a must see due to the acting, casting, and character design alone.  One can’t help but like Sugar Hill.  She is portrayed as a strong, powerful woman, which I’m a sucker for in horror movies.  She is full of sass, isn’t afraid to risk her soul for sweet revenge, and whenever she is opposed with conflict, she remains calm with stone cold features.

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The overzealous portrayal of Baron Samedi is one of the most diabolic representations I have ever seen.  Rather his character moping about, he is energy driven with a wide-eyed gaze and a brazen grin.  By the glee he displays when assisting Sugar Hill, we can assume he loves his job.

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Mama Maitreese is a fun character because she is the true personification of what one might expect from an elderly voodoo queen.  She is full of knowledge, advice, and behind her grandmotherly appearance is a force not to be reckoned with.

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After honoring the strongest of Sugar Hill’s cast, I can’t close this blog without expressing my admiration towards her zombie gang.  Unlike the flesh-eating zombies that we have become so accustomed to in movies and literature, these zombies are the traditional Haitian ghoul whose sole purpose isn’t to eat, but serve their conjurer.  Their makeup and their bulbous, glassy eyes feel soulless, robotic, and they somewhat pay homage to the zombies featured in, I Walked with a Zombie.

I hope everyone enjoyed this list.  Besides the five movies I spoke of, there are quite a few other classics in circulation regarding African American themed horror.  At the moment, I’m not sure if I want to focus on movies or books for next Black History Month.  Instead of racking my brains over the subject, how about I leave the decision up to you?  Would you prefer next year’s African American Horror blog to be based on movies or books?  Please, leave your answer in the comments.

P.S. If you say movies, there’s a chance I will have quite a few contemporary films listed, most of which, everyone has already seen.  If you say books, there’s a chance I will have quite a few hidden gems up my sleeve.  The choice is yours.

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P.S.S.  Please use these links to connect with me via social media.

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Jack O’ Lantern Shot Recipe

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, books, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, drink recipes, drinks, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, frightening, Gay Horror Authors, Halloween, Halloween Books, halloween recipes, holidays, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, interviews, investigation, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, october, paranormal, Pro Se Press, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scarticia, scary, south, southern authors, spirits, The Night The Jack O Lantern Went Out, Uncategorized with tags on September 27, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

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Last night, I shared online that I concocted a secret shot recipe for my new book, The Night the Jack O’ Lantern Went Out.

I offered to reveal that recipe, if TNTJWO was shared over 13+ times. Due to everyone’s support and love, here is my secret recipe.

Jack O’ Lantern Shot

Rim shot glass with:

Maple Syrup & Brown Sugar

Fill shot glass with:

Half Pumpkin Vodka

Half Amaretto Liquor

Enjoy!

For those who are unfamiliar with TNTJWO, this book is a collection of 13 vintage Halloween stories that are themed around folklore, customs, and superstitions. On its release date, it was ranked in the top 100 under 3 bestseller lists on www.Amazon.com.

Lists include:

Ebooks

#19 Horror Short Stories

#88 Genre Fiction/ Holidays

Books

#93 Holidays

TNTJWO is already on its way to becoming a holiday cult classic with young adults and adults. Order your paperback or ebook by clicking HERE.

View a teaser trailer HERE.

 

 

Interview with Actress Sylvia Brown from The Acquired Taste

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, books, chuck jett, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, frightening, Gay Horror Authors, holidays, Horror, horror art, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, movie discussion, movie review, movies, new horror movies, Pro Se Press, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, scary movies, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Traumatized by Alexander S. Brown, Uncategorized on September 15, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

The Acquired Taste is a short film written for screen and directed by Chuck Jett, creator of Empty Coffin Studio Films.  It was tastefully adapted by the short story of the same title by author and producer Alexander S. Brown.  Fans can anticipate a free viewing of the film in 2017.  It is currently being shown at conventions throughout the Southern states.  Its next appearance will be at Contraflow Convention in New Orleans, LA.

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For the final interview from this dark comedy, I would like to welcome actress Sylvia Brown, so that she may elaborate on her part in The Acquired Taste and her life.

 

  1. What made you want to be a part of The Acquired Taste?

I wanted to help my son and see what it was like to act in a film.

  1. What was your experience like on set?

Everyone was nice and polite and had patience with me.

  1. What other projects have you been a part of?

A couple of school plays.

  1. Are there any roles that you would turn down? Or are there any roles that would make you uncomfortable?

Any that regard nudity, animal abuse, and child abuse.

  1. What role is more fun? The victim, the hero, or the villain. Why?

The villain.  I’d rather do it to someone else; rather than have it done to me.

  1. What got you into acting?

My son.  When he wrote the short story The Acquired Taste, he had me in mind as the mother.

  1. What are some of your favorite movies?

Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Wizard of Oz, Footloose, Dirty Dancing, Ghost, Stripes, Haunted Honeymoon, Ghost Dad, Back to the Future, E.T., Carousel, Free Willie, Snow Day, Are We there Yet, Romeo and Juliet, What Dreams May Come, Encino Man, The Goonies, The Poseidon Adventure, and many more.

  1. Who are your favorite actors/actresses? How do you draw inspiration from them?

Judy Garland, Michael J. Fox, and The Rock

  1. Who are your favorite directors?

Stephen Spielberg

  1. What future projects are you working on?

None, at the moment.

  1. Tell us about yourself.

I’m a homebody person for the most part.  My interests are family, animals, animal rights and activism, paranormal research, astrology, and music.

Connect with Sylvia Brown:

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Purchase a copy of Traumatized HERE!

Watch Chuck Jett’s first short film, PINKY SWEAR HERE!

 

Ever Wondered How Those Stories Get Started?

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, authors, books, cult books, cult classic, Cult horror, Dark Oak Press, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, Gay Horror Authors, Halloween, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, literature, Literatures, Mississippi, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized, werewolf, werewolves on September 14, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

Happy Werewolf Wednesday!  Instead of Instagraming/Facebooking/Twittering werewolf jokes today, as usual, I decided to address some reoccurring questions that readers had about my novel Syrenthia Falls.  For those who haven’t read my novel, don’t worry, my answers shouldn’t give away any major spoilers, and if you like what you see, Amazon links will be provided at the conclusion of my blog.  If you have never read Syrenthia Falls, this is what you can expect:

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Syrenthia is a teenage misfit who has never tasted friendship or romance. She has always been typecast as a wallflower, black sheep, and bookworm. Near the beginning of her senior year, she is befriended by Sarah who introduces her to a group of classmates that accept her as is.

Syrenthia quickly learns that this group of free spirited teenagers shares her strongest interest, urban legends. Each day, she learns more and more about a place called “The Falls” where someone or something has terrorized the land for years and only those with a death wish dare to venture out.

Upon arrival, the friends see that “The Falls” is nothing more than a swimming hole, a sandbar, and a waterfall. All is fun and games, until night falls. Once the full moon shines overhead, they are faced with a monstrous beast that is savage and extremely hungry. Only two people survive, one escapes unharmed, the other, Syrenthia, is not so lucky. However, over the passing weeks, Syrenthia grows to be a powerful and dangerous force. One by one her enemies are subjected to her wrath.

Now, the questions:

 “What makes your werewolf novel stand out among the rest?” 

I hear this question frequently.  Even when I pitched Syrenthia Falls to Dark Oak Press, I had to quickly explain why this book should be published, and how it differed from other novels.  I started my pitch with a mistake.  Nervous, I took a deep breath and blurted, “This book is the first in a series and the main character is the town itself.”

My publisher replied, “Yeah, that hasn’t been done before.”

Still, I had the floor. I agreed with him, and admitted that having a town as the main character was a common theme among the genre.  Since the ice was now broken, I felt like I had nothing left to lose.  I continued, “Syrenthia Falls is a werewolf novel set in suburbia.  In a sense, it’s like Stephen King’s Carrie meets An American Werewolf in London.  The werewolf is a metaphor.  It regards the beast that dwells within each of us and how that beast can become provoked.  That’s why with my novel, I have manipulated the werewolf subgenre so that it is presented as a retelling of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.”

With my publisher’s interest piqued, I now felt more confident.  I continued, “To avoid the werewolf cliché, I researched Voodoo, Satanism, and European superstitions.  In my research, I have found unique folklore and philosophies that I have used to construct my modern day beast.”

Although he wasn’t entirely sold, he did say, “Send it over and I’ll look at it.”

Months later, after emailing Dark Oak Press my manuscript, I received my acceptance letter.

“What fun facts can you tell me about your book?”

Some people who have read Syrenthia Falls, might wonder why I have described some characters who don’t show back up in this volume.  Trust, there is a reason for this, they have their own story.  In time, they will have their own book.  Again, the town is the main character and this town (Havensburg) has many residents and many dark secrets.  In the following Havensburg books, I plan to introduce new characters, lifestyles, scenarios, and classic creatures while breathing new life into them.

As I earlier noted, my werewolf was inspired by Voodoo, Satanism, and European superstitions and philosophies.  Prior to writing Syrenthia Falls, I had read a book called Voodoo Secrets by Heike Owusu.  This book had a segment in it, where it spoke of how werewolves detested bitter blood, and the two elements that made the blood bitter were coffee or tea.  It noted that by purging oneself with coffee or tea, one’s blood would gain a bitter smell that would act as a repellent against the werewolf.  When utilizing this information, I decided to go a step further and make the tea a weapon, such as silver.

I researched Levayan Satanism when I decided to dive into Syrenthia’s thoughts.  When I was surfing the web one day, I stumbled upon an interview that Bob Larson provided to Zeena Levay and Nikolas Schreck.  In this interview, I learned what their fundaments were and I found it interesting on how human based they had made their commandments. These are the fundamentals that I loosely elaborated upon in her thought process.

For the final touch, I returned to the root of werewolf folklore – Europe.  In my research, I learned of a formula that occult practitioners would concoct when wanting to transform into a werewolf.  So that I could birth my physical monster, I read of how these practitioners utilized herbs, wolf skins, salves, and chanting to create something bloodthirsty.  What I found most interesting is that opium had been used in their transformation spell.

“I thought the book was young adult, but it ended up being adult.”

This was a complaint that I received in a review.  Things like this happen.  However, just because a novel features teenagers, doesn’t mean it is young adult related.  But, truth be it, this was a concern I had when writing the novel.  When creating the characters, I couldn’t see them being anyone other than a group of teenagers, as I wanted to focus on peer pressure, child abuse, bullying, and coming of age.  Yet, although I focused on these subjects, the book is intended for adults only.

Who are your favorite characters?”

Each of my lead characters are based off of people I know, so I favor all of them.

Sarah is one of my favorites, as she grows from being an abused child, to being a fighter.  Writing Sarah was a touchy subject.  I based her off of a high school friend who suffered sexual abuse while we were in school.  During our school years, I watched her go from being a victim, to becoming a heroine.

My favorite character, of course, is Syrenthia.  The reason being is because I could identify with her as a person who was once a shy outcast.  The emotions and feelings she experiences make her a grey character and someone that people can either sympathize or empathize with.  The fact that she is the embodiment of good and evil, makes her more interesting.

“Why did you name your book Syrenthia Falls when the character is named Syrenthia and there is a location called Owen Falls?  The two don’t go together.”

I have been asked this on occasion and actually, the two go very well together.  The title regards Syrenthia descending a downward spiral.  As the reader progresses in the book, they see how she slowly unravels more and more until there is very little of the real Syrenthia left.  The waterfall also plays a great factor in this novel, as this is where Syrenthia begins her downward spiral, and in many cultures, water is seen as a symbol of transformation and rebirth.

“Why should I buy your book?”

Syrenthia Falls is a novel that I feel won’t disappoint you and I feel it is something that will renew the age old legend of the werewolf.  It is a piece of literature that has currently inspired artwork by Courtney Vice and tea by Kimberly Richardson.  Links are listed below so you may purchase my book and the inspired art and tea.

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Click each name to be redirected to the page of your liking.

Courtney Vice’s Facebook Page

Viridian Tea Company

Dark Oak Press (Free chapter of Syrenthia Falls Here).

Syrenthia Falls purchase link.  Available in paperback, hardback, and ebook.

Alexander S. Brown Facebook

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Interview with Artist/Actor Vice Verse

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, artist interview, books, chuck jett, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, frightening, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, interviews, literature, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, movie discussion, movies, new horror movies, Pro Se Press, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, scary movies, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized, vice verse on August 31, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

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The Acquired Taste is a short film written for screen and directed by Chuck Jett, creator of Empty Coffin Studio Films.  It was tastefully adapted by the short story of the same title by author and producer Alexander S. Brown.  Fans can anticipate a free viewing of the film in 2017.  It is currently being shown at conventions throughout the Southern states.  Its next appearance will be at Contraflow Convention in New Orleans, LA.

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For the next interview from this dark comedy, I would like to welcome actor Vice Verse, so that he may elaborate on his part in The Acquired Taste and his life.

 

  1. What made you want to be a part of The Acquired Taste?

My good friend Charles Jett who asked me to be a part of his short horror film “Pinky Swear”, asked me if I wanted to be in “The Acquired Taste”.  I said sure.

  1. What was your experience like on set?

Had a great time on set.  Even if it was one day, I had a ball.

  1. What other projects have you been a part of?

As far as acting, I was a thespian in High School.  I had a part in the movie “Save The Last Dance”, which was edited out, and I was in the short horror film by Charles Jett, “Pinky Swear”.

  1. Are there any roles that you would turn down? Or are there any roles that would make you uncomfortable?

It depends.  Anything dealing with an Ouija board I may have to pass on. lol

  1. What role is more fun? The victim, the hero, or the villain. Why?

I would say the villain or hero.  You can use all your acting capabilities doing either of those roles.

  1. What got you into acting?

My 5th grade art teacher.  I was always in talent shows and she tapped into my talents of acting.

  1. What are some of your favorite movies?

I love all 3 Godfather movies… Glory…Any movie with Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Denzel Washington, and Don Cheadle.  One of my favorite movies is “True Romance”.

  1. Who are your favorite actors/actresses? How do you draw inspiration from them?

Well, I kind of answered that above.  But I just watch how they approach a certain character.  How they use all the nuisances they can.  I just watch and learn.

  1. Who are your favorite directors?

Hmmmmm, Spielberg, Spike Lee, Harvey Fuqua just to name a few.

  1. What future projects are you working on?

I’m an artist/songwriter and I’m working on a new EP/Album entitled “Smoke&Mirrors”…which is a concept album talking about the ups and downs artists go through in the music business.

  1. Tell us about yourself.

I’m an artist by the name of Vice Verse…a songwriter/ghostwriter. Just an all-around talented individual that you will see more of in the future.

Connect with Vice Verse by clicking on the following social media names:

Instagram

Purchase a copy of Traumatized HERE!

Watch Chuck Jett’s first short film featuring Vice Verse, PINKY SWEAR HERE!

Interview with Actress Chelsea Downs

Posted in Alexander S. Brown, Amazon, books, chuck jett, cult books, cult classic, cult classics, cult favorites, Cult horror, discussion, entertaining, entertainment, fandom, Fiction, Horror, horror art, horror artist, Horror Authors, Horror Book, Horror Books, Horror Fans, Horror Fiction, horror literature, Horror Lovers, Horror Movies, Horror Punks, Horror Readers, Independent Horror, interviews, literature, Mississippi, mississippi art, mississippi authors, mississippi horror artists, Mississippi Horror Author, movie discussion, new horror movies, Read, readers, reading, Readings, scary, scary movies, south, southern authors, Splatterpunk, Uncategorized on August 15, 2016 by Alexander S. Brown

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The Acquired Taste is a short film written for screen and directed by Chuck Jett, creator of Empty Coffin Studio Films.  It was tastefully adapted by the short story of the same title by author and producer Alexander S. Brown.  Fans can anticipate a free viewing of the film in 2017.  It is currently being shown at conventions throughout the Southern states.  Its next appearance will be at Contraflow Convention in New Orleans, LA.

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For the fourth interview from this dark comedy, I would like to welcome actress Chelsea Downs, so that she may elaborate on her part in The Acquired Taste and her life.

  1. What made you want to be a part of The Acquired Taste?

I wanted to act in one of Chuck Jett’s movies and it happened to be Alex’s book that he was doing, so it was perfect. I also really loved the story, as well.

  1. What was your experience like on set?

It was so much fun, like a lot of friends hanging out.

  1. What other projects have you been a part of?

I haven’t been a part of any other movies.  But I help chuck Jett when he wants someone to critique his work.

  1. Are there any roles that you would turn down? Or are there any roles that would make you uncomfortable?

I don’t think so. I haven’t had much experience to know for sure just yet.

  1. What role is more fun? The victim, the hero, or the villain. Why?

I think it would be fun to be a villain, just so I can be out of my everyday element.

  1. What got you into acting?

Ever since I was little, I wanted to act. Who doesn’t want to play pretend for a living?

  1. What are some of your favorite movies?

I’ll watch pretty much anything, but my favorite movie is, Now and Then. I don’t know why, but I have always loved that movie.

  1. Who are your favorite actors/actresses? How do you draw inspiration from them?

Johnny Depp because he can be anything anyone asks him to be, and I love that.

  1. Who are your favorite directors?

Jerry Bruckheimer, I love what he did with pirate movies.  Also, Tim Burton, I love his dark side to his movies.

  1. What future projects are you working on?

Nothing as of right now.

  1. Tell us about yourself.

I’m in my late twenties. I love to cosplay and become characters, going to cons is one of my favorite things to do, it’s like hanging out with my other family. I’m a huge geek who watches any and every movie. I love reading comics and books. I’m just your geeky girl next door.

 Connect with Chelsea Downs by clicking on the following social media names:

Facebook

Purchase a copy of Traumatized HERE!

Watch Chuck Jett’s first short film, PINKY SWEAR HERE!